Valencian Ceramics: All There Is To Know

Valencian ceramics, or Ceramics of Manises, is part of the beautiful legacy left behind by the Moorish culture. Valencia’s town of Manises is the regional ceramics production hub. Learn everything there is to know about Valencian ceramics in this post.

 

Valencian ceramics is one of the legacies left behind by the Moors. The local town of Manises is the ceramics hub in this region.

 

What are the origins of Valencian ceramics?

The origins of Valencian ceramics are in the pottery craft that has always been so typical of the Arab world.  In the first quarter of the 1300’s (when the region was already back under Christian rule, but the Moorish culture was still very much present) is when the little town of Manises was put on the map as a major ceramics manufacturer.

Beautiful church in Manises adorned with Valencian Ceramics.

A beautiful church in Manises adorned with Valencian Ceramics.

 

In Manises they applied a 3rd layer of a metal blend to make the glazing have a metallic glow. Valencian ceramics became very popular in Europe, and held that position until the end of the 1500’s.

In the 18th century the deep blue hue became a signature color of Manises ceramics.

The local tourism office clad with typical Manises blue tiling.

The tourism office in Manises clad with typical Manises blue tiling.

 

You can find local ceramics in many museums all over the world: the British Museum, LACMA, Victoria and Albert Museum etc.

 

Where can I see Valencian Ceramics in Valencia?

You can see such traditional signage all over the Valencian region.

You can see such traditional signage all over the Valencian region.

 

The town of Manises is just a short metro ride away. The emblematic buildings are marked on this map, but the most important one to visit is the fine Ceramics museum. It is housed in an 18th century mansion and holds a collection of the traditional Manises ceramics from the 14th century until present.

Other tile clad landmarks to visit are the Els Filtres park and its underground museum, Casa de Cultura (1923), and the dazzling El Arte building, housing the Tourism Info office.

There is also the beautiful façade of the former tile factory (1900-1910). Its architectural style is inspired by Valencia’s Silk Exchange itself! This was one of Spain’s biggest ceramics producer.

Do not miss out on visiting the Iglesia Parroquial de San Juan Bautista church to admire its precious exterior, and the 18th century ceramic pieces inside.

You can also attend a workshop and get your hands dirty in clay, while making your own pottery and painting it. This visit option also includes viewing of a documentary on the craft. The workshop’s duration is 1 h 45 min. Book your visit (Mon-Fri from 10 am until 5pm) in advance via www.avec.com.

Once in Manises, why not also visit Els Arcs aqueduct, which was founded by the Romans just outisde of the actual town.

No doubt, if you like painted ceramics make sure to plan a half day trip to Manises during your stay in Valencia.

Former railway station in Manises.

Former railway station in Manises.

 

If you enjoy discovering new vibrant cultures, why not join my delicious & filling day time food tour? This informative tour starts at the Central Market (more ceramic tiles!) and includes multiple tasting of the most emblematic Valencian foods, paella valenciana being one of them. Book your tour online!

Daria Gushchenkova

Spain lover living in Valencia. She runs food tours in Valencia and writes about Spanish cuisine & travel in her blog.
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By admin / Administrator, bbp_keymaster

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on Jun 16, 2017

Spain lover living in Valencia. She runs food tours in Valencia and writes about Spanish cuisine & travel in her blog.

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